Wayfinding in major waterfront points of interest in Queensland Australia – A case study in Surfers Paradise

This paper presents a study exploring wayfinding in major waterfront points of interest in Queensland, Australia. Waterfronts are often highly significant spaces, contributing to the tourism industry as urban tourist attractions and providing quality leisure spaces for residents. Wayfinding is a critical issue for tourists walking or driving through urban waterfronts, and may affect a…

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Developing experimental protocol for collecting large scale urban microclimate data through community participation

Uncomfortable outdoor environments impact the liveability of cities and urban economy. This paper discusses the experimental protocols developed as part of a citizen science project on improving urban microclimates. The term “citizen science” broadly describes public engagement in scientific research in collaboration with professional scientists. This citizen science project aims to engage communities across Australia…

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Stepping back: a look at managed retreat in NZ

In 1990 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change proposed the adaptation strategies of Protect, Accommodate and Retreat, and these were adopted and incorporated into New Zealand’s national policy. This paper investigates the practice of managed retreat in New Zealand, with the aim to understand how the strategy has been implemented in the coastal environment. Some…

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Street greenery; a vital planning integration to overcome carbon dioxide concentration and pedestrian discomfort in urban streetscapes

With the rapid urbanization, population growth and advancement of technologies, human impact on temperature rise is becoming a severe issue. Unprecedented burning of fossil fuels and deforestation escalate carbon dioxide concentration (CO2) and global warming causing many environmental impacts. Road traffic is identified as a major contributor to CO2 concentration. Integration of street greenery is…

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Urban planning policy practice and climate change adaptation science for sea-level rise impacts upon cultural heritage places in Sorrento, Mornington Peninsula

Climate change, and in particular sea level rise, erosion, storm surges and inundation, poses significant risk to coastal settlements. With such a high proportion of the Australian and Victorian populations inhabiting low lying coastal areas, it is integral that the coastal edge is managed effectively by conducting up to date climate change studies and risk…

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Towards an Energy Modelling Framework for Australian Cities

Accountable for more than 70% of the worldwide CO2 emissions (World Energy Outlook Internatioal Energy Agency 2008) and constantly growing, urban metropolises are the key actors of climate change. A rapid transition of urban areas towards energy efficiency is highly required, in particular for the building stock, which represents the main urban energy consumer. In…

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Designing functional urban open spaces: through user comfort & spatial analysis approach

Due to peculiar topography and extreme high density, Hong Kong’s open space per capita 2 sqm is far from the WHO standards of 9 sqm per person. Open spaces are often regarded as compliance to planning requirements rather than providing desirable outdoor amenities to the community. Due to challenging Summer conditions in Hong Kong such…

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Rehabilitating Healthcare: Healthcare landscapes a catalyst for health, well-being and social equity

With increasing prevalence of mental illness and domestic violence incidents, there is an ever-growing need for supplying supportive and rehabilitative social and health services. In its current state, the healthcare infrastructure, transitional services, and communities are isolated from one another, creating physical and mental barriers for rehabilitation. Therapeutic landscape research suggests outdoor spaces can facilitate…

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Review of Campus Sustainability Rating Systems for Indian Campuses

Sustainable campus development is becoming universal with an increase in the number of campuses demonstrating leadership on pursuing sustainability. Even though there are various international campus sustainability rating and ranking systems but they are not completely utilized in India. The purpose of this study is to analyse and compare eight of these rating systems and…

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Seasonal Patterns of Thermal Stress in the Work Environment of Construction Workers in a Megaproject in Australia

Construction site is the workplace of 8.9 per cent working population in Australia whereas heat stress is a concerning risk. This paper presents initial results of a field study conducted on the site of a mega construction project in Australia in the build-up season (a three months’ period of transition between dry and wet seasons)…

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Lessons in Density: approaches to teaching housing design for higher densities

In cities affected by high growth rates the public debates generated by intensification policies are vigorous, dividing opinion along established political lines: higher densities are generally acceptable to the left, and suburban densities are defended on the right. Auckland, New Zealand is not an exception. In architecture, such opinions and the divisions between them can…

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SETTING UP THE UPSETTER: a vertical studio for architecture

Contemporary education systems tend to subdivide learning groups into horizontal slices of similar age or similar levels of experience or skill. Architectural education programmes in most western countries generally follow this pattern and work in a horizontally stratified manner. Similarly, architecture and design practices tend to ossify in patterns around specialisations in work processes. To…

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Online delivery of architecture and building design studios: a case study of Central Queensland University

Online delivery offers students flexibility to choose when, where, and with what pace they wish to learn. This mode of delivery, however, presents challenges specifically for design studio units, which depend largely on students’ creative processes and facilitating social interactions with their teachers and fellow students. In practice, design is a collaborative process that engages…

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Intensive Design Building Studio: A Collaboration with Industry

The purpose of this paper is to explore a case study project between a timber supplier, industry body and an architecture school. The project, an installation stand, became a test to access how resilient junior architectural students can uptake digital fabrication technologies. The brief was simple, design a product that visitors could touch, create conversation…

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Women in Fabrication: A platform for inclusive and diverse design

In New Zealand, over half of our architectural graduates are female but this number significantly drops within professional practice. The fact remains that industry is a male citadel whether in the realm of design or manufacture. This paper explores a new generation of women building their own coalitions and strategies that promise to bring about…

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Using eye-tracking to study designers’ cognitive behaviour when designing with CAAD

This paper presents a case study exploring the eye-movement of two architecture master students while using a CAAD tool. The students completed an architectural design task using CAAD software in a 60 minute design session. The “Think aloud” method was used to collect cognitive data while their eye movements were captured using eye-tracking equipment. The…

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Students’ perspectives on configuration design of universities’ informal learning spaces

Across the Australian tertiary education sector and worldwide, the number of informal learning spaces has increased in newly constructed and retrofitted university campus projects. Research on these informal learning spaces does not pay much attention to the importance of spatial configuration design and how the configuration characteristics of an informal learning space may influence students’…

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Assessing Design Value systems: fragmentation, competition, and crisis in a global industry

Measuring Design Value has always been a difficult task for architects. This paper begins to describe the landscape of design value tools currently utilised across the globe. Inherent in assessing design value are questions of its definition, measurability, and implementation. The identification of factors which contribute to design value includes economic, environmental, and cultural factors….

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Prefabrication: New Zealand’s golden ticket?

The construction industry within New Zealand is currently experiencing a boom and is the largest sector of the country’s infrastructure. Although substantial, the industry continues to suffer from inflated costs, low-productivity and lack of innovation. Sparsely developed methods from the beginnings of construction in New Zealand are still practiced today, attributing to low-productivity and the…

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Diversified façade architecture for optimizing air flow in tall residential buildings in tropics: a field investigation based on a literature review

In this paper, a theoretical framework was developed to assess optimization of diverse vertical wind climate in tall, residential buildings in enhancing indoor comfort. A total of 200 papers were reviewed in respect to two subject areas; i.e. preferred air speeds for indoor comfort and vertical climatic behaviour around high-rise buildings. Both subject areas were…

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Towards a comprehensive hybrid life cycle inventory for Chilean building materials

Economic growth often results in an increased demand for energy and resources. This is the case of Chile, a country that although has managed to become a leading economy in the South American region, is still strongly dependent on extractive industries and imported fossil fuels. In this context, the Chilean building sector is one of…

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Incremental Strategies for Suburban Densification

Sprawling, low density development dominates and destroys natural landscapes and productive farm land at the edges of urban centres. Yet, suburbs continue to grow outwards, requiring continual development of green field sites to keep up with housing demand. Additionally, existing dwellings are demolished to make way for new developments with minimally increased density, creating waste…

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Designing for relationships: housing and communities that improve the quality of life of the high-needs elderly

Globally population profiles are ageing and the proportion of elderly people with high-care needs is projected to increase at an even higher rate. Subsequently, there is an increasing demand for housing that can support independence and provide a high Quality of Life (QoL). Relationships are one of the significant contributors to QoL for the high-needs…

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Occupant Satisfaction and Comfort in Green Buildings: A Longitudinal Occupant Survey in a Green Building in the Subtropical Climate in Australia

Understanding occupant expectation and feedback is an important part of building performance evaluation. This paper explores occupant satisfaction change during a 10-year period in a green building located in the subtropical zone. Occupant satisfaction at two timestamps, three and ten years after project completion, were compared. It was observed that occupant satisfaction regarding indoor air…

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